VICTOR POLSTER DE STER VAN ‘GIRL’

VICTOR POLSTER DE STER VAN ‘GIRL’

31/10/2018
Sweet sixteen  Als de ster van ‘Girl’ niet – alwéér – op een rode loper staat, danst hij de ziel...
Anna Luyten in Gioia Seghers

Anna Luyten in Gioia Seghers

30/10/2018
BOEK EN TOREN  De Boekenbeurs is de jaarlijkse hoogmis voor boekenwurmen en handtekeningenjagers....
Men window

Men window

03/10/2018
Stephan Schneider AW18

Stephan Schneider AW18

02/10/2018
Raf Simons   Y/project AW18

Raf Simons Y/project AW18

01/10/2018
Counter

Counter

30/09/2018
Walter van Beirendonck AW18

Walter van Beirendonck AW18

29/09/2018
Dries van Noten AW18

Dries van Noten AW18

28/09/2018
Women window

Women window

28/09/2018
Dries van Noten women AW18

Dries van Noten women AW18

27/09/2018
Long view

Long view

26/09/2018
Ann Demeulemeester AW18

Ann Demeulemeester AW18

25/09/2018
Unlikely Muses: the city of Staphorst

Unlikely Muses: the city of Staphorst

09/03/2017

While the fashion industry is still struggling to publically pronounce a reply in face of recent political changes, Walter Van Beirendonck has consistently confronted these issues straight-on. Whether it’s intolerance, terrorism, or bigotry, the big-bearded artist found an answer – or at least, a relief – in his designs.

Beauty can save the world. With this mantra in mind, Walter has found the power to shine bright, even in the darkest of times. For his SS17 collection, part of that heartening illumination came from a rather unexpected source: Staphorst, a little town in the Netherlands and its colourful inhabitants.

Proud of their heritage, its close-knit society prefers to remain to itself and seems almost untouched by time. With its picturesque farmhouses, bright green shutters and blue doors, the architecture could have come straight out of a children’s drawing. Staphorst represents the dream-destination for the eternal escapist, a timeless place, cut off from society. This is when you feel the power of beauty, timeless and hidden.

But Walter mostly found inspiration in the folklore, and in particular the Staphorst stipwerk, a rare technique, used to print and decorate fabrics. At its origin, the technique was used in the town’s traditional dress, still worn by the inhabitants today.

The craft was developed to imitate richly embroidered fabrics with objects that could be found around the house. Still today, small pins and nails are attached to wood or cork. The stamps are then immersed in primary coloured-paint and repetitively pressed onto the fabric, creating small floral-like patterns.  

The mesmerising pace of craftwork.